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Could it be CMPA?

EXCESSIVE IRRITABILITY, REFLUX, REGURGITATION, DIARRHEA, SKIN RASHES ARE ALL POSSIBLE SYMPTOMS OF CMPA
Key facts about cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA)
FOOD ALLERGY OR NON-ALLERGIC FOOD HYPERSENSITIVITY
COW’S MILK PROTEIN ALLERGY
LACTOSE INTOLERANCE
IMPORTANCE OF LACTOSE FOR GUT MICROBIOTA
INCIDENCE AND PREVALENCE OF CMPA

Signs & Symptoms of cow’s milk protein allergy

The non-specific signs and symptoms of CMPA, ranging from colic and reflux to constipation, insomnia, eczema, diarrhea and crying, make diagnosis a real challenge. The symptoms involve many different organ systems, predominantly the skin and the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. The involvement of two or more organ systems increases the likelihood of CMPA.

digestive

Digestive


Prevalence of digestive symptoms

Up to 60% of affected infants have digestive symptoms.

Respiratory

Respiratory










Prevalence of respiratory symptoms

Up to 30% of affected infants have respiratory symptoms.

Skin

Skin











Prevalence of skin-related symptoms

Up to 70% of affected infants have skin-related symptoms.

General

General














Inconsolable crying is very common in infants with CMPA, while anaphylaxis is very rare.





Diagnosis of CMPA should always be made by a healthcare professional


REFERENCES

  1. US FDA. Food Allergies: What You Need to Know. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm079311.htm (accessed Jan 2017).
  2. Koletzko S, et al. Diagnostic Approach and Management of Cow’s-Milk Protein Allergy in Infants and Children: ESPGHAN Gl Committee Practical Guidelines. JPGN. 2012;55:221–9.
  3. Heyman MB, et al. Committee on Nutrition. Lactose intolerance in infants, children, and adolescents. Pediatrics. 2006;118(3):1279–86.
  4. Francavilla R, et al. Effect of lactose on gut microbiota and metabolome of infants with cow’s milk allergy. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2012;23(5):420–7.
  5. Prescott SL, et al. A global survey of changing patterns of food allergy burden in children. World Allergy Organ J. 2013;6(1):21.
  6. Høst A. Cow’s milk protein allergy and intolerance in infancy. Some clinical, epidemiological and immunological aspects. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 1994;5:1–36.
  7. NIH. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/lactose-intolerance#statistics (accessed February 2017).
  8. NIH. Lactose intolerance. Available at: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/lactose-intolerance#statistics (accessed February 2017).
IMPORTANT NOTICE: Mothers should be encouraged to continue breastfeeding even when their babies have cow’s milk protein allergy. This usually requires qualified dietary counseling to completely exclude all sources of cow’s milk protein from the mothers’ diet. If a decision to use a special formula intended for infants is taken, it is important to follow the instructions on the label. Unboiled water, unboiled bottles or incorrect dilution can make babies ill. Incorrect storage, handling, preparation and feeding can eventually lead to adverse effects on the health of babies. Formula for special medical purposes intended for infants must be used under medical supervision.